Friday, October 19, 2007

Mmmmm, lappy.

The Asus EEE PC has now rolled out in Taiwan, where they are literally flying off of the shelves.  Sadly, I cant read any of the reviews, so I'm waiting eagerly for someone in the states to import one and tell me how awesome it is.  According to the internet, they will be released through Newegg on the first of November.  I guess I'm getting myself a Guy Fawkes Day present this year (3-4 day shipping, should get here by the 5th).  On a related note, the fifth falls on a Monday this year.  This has little relevance to me, since I've been not sleeping enough during the week even without the intervention of obscure English holidays.

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Robert Alverson

m*lambda=d*sine(theta)

Evaluations

I really enjoy the system of evaluations here at UCSC, and like to think I use it to its fullest potential.  In looking back through my evals, I noted one in particular, " Robert's lab performance was average, and his final exam score was average.  Overall, Robert's performance was average." Oddly enough, thats what I thought about them too (Chem 1C lab).  My evals got better once my classes became more interesting, but there is always a re-occurring theme of not participating enough in sections.  I'm terribly surprised at this, since I'm an extraordinarily outgoing person who loves to be around people all the time and is so talkative.  Yup.  Very surprised.   There is also a consistent theme of writing well, or at the very least well enough for it to be noted in my evals.  It always kinda throws me when teachers don't dismiss my writing, since I feel that its not my strong suit.  Reading is my strong suit, creating connections and ideas are strong suits but not writing.  Writing ranks barely above math in on the list of "things I think I do well."  Perhaps it would be a good time to move it up near "eating massive amounts of pasta" or "conceptualizing abstracts visually."

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Robert Alverson

m*lambda=d*sine(theta)

Friday, October 12, 2007

Uclue

Uclue is a nifty little site where, for a fee, you can get real people to get you answers to your questions. The really nice part is that the questions that have beens answered already are posted publicly, so there is a nice database that you can look through. I'd give this a very high usefulness rating, plus its even better than the wikipedia random page for finding out new things. For example, have you ever wondered how much Chocolate could a young lady buy for Five Shillings in 1925? Or perhaps what liquids other than milk that you can put on your cereal? I never have, but hey, apparently someone did.

On an unrelated note, it's started raining in SC again. Hopefully this winter won't be as dry as the last one, or we are in for some bad times.
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Robert Alverson

m*lambda=d*sine(theta)

Thursday, October 11, 2007

A Historical Note

I did a bit of poking around into the Hindenburg, since air disasters are an interest of mine, and because I used the "Oh, the humanity" quote as the title in my previous post and wanted to give it proper attribution.  The quote is attributed to Herbert Morrison, and is actually used somewhat incorrectly, as the full text of the quote is "Oh, the humanity and all the passengers."  Morrison was using the word humanity to refer to the ground crew, rather than all the people involved in the accident.  This puts a slightly different take on using just the "Oh, the humanity", but as this quote has been taken so far out of context by pop culture, I doubt that anyone other than myself cares.

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Robert Alverson

m*lambda=d*sine(theta)

Monday, October 8, 2007

Oh, the Humanity!

Through careful research and study I have determined that life has to be the most hilarious joke ever (rivaled only by "Supercollider? I hardly know her...").  How can you not look back at where humanity has come from and laugh.  Look at our previous views and philosophies, those can be downright absurd.  But the overview isn't even the best part.  Looking at your life what parts do you find funny?  What parts really sucked, but are now your best hilarious anecdotes? Life has a way of coming full circle in that manner: the ex-girlfriend that ripped your soul out is a fun way to relate to other guys, the time you missed your exit...by 300 miles, and the one time with the thing at the place.  Hilarity ensued, you just didn't realize it at the time.  We need to realize that when our lives are at the most absurd, shit is hitting the fan and nothing makes any sense whatsoever, those are the parts you're going to talk about years later.  The ups you'll look back at fondly, but the downs are the funny stories you will repeat until everyone knows it by heart.  Which isn't to say that the hilariously awesome parts of your life don't make good anecdotes.  Obviously they do, but you already knew that.  But you weren't laughing when you chopped your arm off, and you should have been.  Can you believe what an awesome story that will be?  You could sell that story for money, call it "Cautionary Tales of Forklifts."

--
Robert Alverson

m*lambda=d*sine(theta)

Thursday, October 4, 2007

Facebook

I am starting to feel the beginning of the end for my fling with Facebook.  It was fun while it lasted, with the joining silly groups, posting on walls and friend-ing people, but overall the fun and pop just isn't there any more.  The groups are not generally active in any regard other than really inane posts, and don't further the user experience.  Most of the groups I'm in have not had new topics since last year; which is a shame since some of them were quite interesting.  It seems to me that a large part of Facebook is using it as a platform to wave at the world and say, "Look! Here I am!"  This is all well and good as many people enjoy that, and admittedly I do too (Why else would I have a blog?).  However, with the increased popularity, scads of widgets that seem to not serve any purpose, and declining utility of Facebook, I think that now is the time to put my social chips into maintaining and expanding my Google presence rather than my Facebook one.  So for further updates in the life of Robert, as few and far between as those are, stay tuned to this channel.  As a side note, I've managed to carve out a niche in the web for myself: searching "Robert Alverson UCSC" gets me as the first few hits, and "mightysinetheta" is of course all me.  "Robert Alverson" without the "UCSC" gives me roughly the 22nd hit, much improved over the 100th+ last year.
--
Robert Alverson

m*lambda=d*sine(theta)